Top 10 Largest Islands

Below is a list showing the top 10 largest islands in the world. Some people think Australia is an island but it’s not an island.

 

 

10. Ellesmere Island (Canada)

Ellesmere Island is part of the Qikiqtaaluk Region of the Canadian territory of Nunavut. Lying within the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, it is considered part of the Queen Elizabeth Islands, with Cape Columbia being the most northerly point of land in Canada. It comprises an area of 75,767 sq miles and the total length of the island is 520 miles, making it the world’s tenth largest island and Canada’s third largest island.

 

 

9. Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales)

Great Britain is situated on the European continental shelf and to the northwest of Continental Europe and east of Ireland. It is separated from the continent by the North Sea and by the English Channel, which narrows to 21 miles at the Straits of Dover. It stretches over about ten degrees of latitude on its longer, north-south axis, and occupies an area of 80,823 sq miles, excluding all the smaller surrounding islands of the archipelago.

 

 

8. Victoria Island (Canada)

Victoria Island  is an island in Canada. It is the eighth largest island in the world, and at 217,291 km2 (83,897 sq mi) is Canada’s second largest island. It is nearly double the size of Newfoundland (111,390 km2 (43,008 sq mi)), and is slightly larger than the island of Great Britain 80,823 sq mi). The western third of the island belongs to the Inuvik Region in the Northwest Territories; the remainder is part of Nunavut’s Kitikmeot Region.

 

 

7. Honshu Island (Japan)

The island is roughly 1,300 kilometres (810 mi) long and ranges from 50 to 230 km (31 to 140 mi) wide, and its total area is 227,962.59 km2 (88,016.85 sq mi), 60% of the total area of Japan. It is larger than Great Britain, and slightly larger than the American state of Minnesota. Its area has been expanding with land reclamation and coastal uplift in the north, but global sea level rise has diminished these effects. Honshu has 5,450 kilometres (3,386 mi) of coastline.

 

 

6. Sumatra Island (Indonesia)

Sumatra is an island in western Indonesia, westernmost of the Sunda Islands. It is the largest island entirely in Indonesia (two larger islands, Borneo and New Guinea, are shared between Indonesia and other countries) and the sixth largest island in the world at 473,481 km2 with a population of 50,365,538. Its biggest city is Medan with a population of 2,109,330.

 

 

5. Baffin Island (Canada)

Baffin Island in the Canadian territory of Nunavut, is the largest island in Canada and the fifth largest island in the world. Its area is 507,451 km2 (195,928 sq mi) and its population is about 11,000 (2007 estimate). Named after English explorer William Baffin, it is likely that the island was known to Pre-Columbian Norse of Greenland and Iceland and may be the location of Helluland, spoken of in the Icelandic sagas (the Saga of Erik the Red (Eiríks saga rauða) and the Grœnlendinga saga).

 

 

4. Madagascar

Madagascar, officially the Republic of Madagascar and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the southeastern coast of Africa. It is the fourth largest island in the world. The highest point is Maromokotro, in the Tsaratanana Massif region in the north of the island, at 2,876 metres (9,436 ft). The capital Antananarivo is in the Hauts Plateaux near the centre of the island. It has a total area of 587,040 square kilometres (226,660 sq mi) with 581,540 square kilometres (224,530 sq mi) of land and 5,500 square kilometres (2,100 sq mi) of water.

 

 

3. Borneo (Brunei, Malaysia and Indonesia)

Borneo is the third largest island in the world and is located north of Java, Indonesia, at the geographic centre of Maritime Southeast Asia. With an area of 743,330 square kilometres (287,000 sq mi), it is the third-largest island in the world. Its highest point is Mount Kinabalu in Sabah, Malaysia, with an elevation of 4,095 m (13,435 ft).

 

 

2. New Guinea (Indonesia and Papua New Guinea)

New Guinea  is the world’s second largest island, after Greenland, covering a land area of 786,000 km2. Located in the southwest Pacific Ocean, it lies geographically to the east of the Malay Archipelago, with which it is sometimes included as part of a greater Indo-Australian Archipelago. Geologically it is a part of the same tectonic plate as Australia. When world sea levels were low, the two shared shorelines (which now lie 100 to 140 metres below sea level), combining with lands now inundated into the tectonic continent of Sahul, also known as Greater Australia.

 

 

1. Greenland

Greenland is located between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean, northeast of Canada and northwest of Iceland. Greenland has no land boundaries and 44,087 km of coastline. A sparse population is confined to small settlements along the coast. Greenland possesses the world’s second largest ice sheet. The total area of Greenland is  2,175,600 km²

Greenland sits atop the Greenland plate, a subplate of the North American plate. The Greenland craton is made up of some of the oldest rocks on the face of the earth. The Isua greenstone belt in southwestern Greenland contains the oldest known rocks on Earth, dated at 3.7–3.8 billion years old.

 

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